Vanke Experience Center by Urbanus


 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

The Vanke Experience Center by Urbanus is located in Shenzhen, China. It is the research facility of Vanke China, the largest real estate developer in the country.

 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

The experience center is located within an existing 1500 square meter rectangular exhibition hall that is four storeys high. With heavy, concrete supports and a regular floor plan, the old structure was sterile and uninspiring.

 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

In order to create a stimulating and imaginative environment, Urbanus inserted a light and transparent free form structure within the existing exhibition hall.

 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

The interior of the building is also an experiment in the design of convertible spaces. Multifunctional in nature, they showcase the possibilities of space.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Urbanus is a architecture and urban design practice with offices in Shenzhen and Beijing. The firm’s works have been featured in publications such as Abitare, a+u, and Domus.

References: Zhulong, HomeWorld, BuildHR, Chinese-Architects

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TM Studio Office by TM Studio


Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Based in Shanghai, China, TM Studio is headed by principal architect Tong Ming.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

In the renovation of their office space, a small residential unit located near Tongji University, all the non-supporting walls were torn down, expended, and merged to create one central space.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Following that, entire walls and ceilings were cladded with wood. Movable and foldable wooden doors were then installed, to achieve a functional flexibility that equips the studio to deal with different occasions.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Via: Chinese-Architects

Suquan Court by TM Studio


 Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Built as a flexible space to accommodate a variety of commercial functions, Suquan Court by TM Studio is located in Suzhou, China.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

In order to accommodate future events and functions which were not known during the design stage, it was designed as a free plan.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

One of the most distinctive elements of the building is its façade. Featuring a hexagonal pattern, the long vertical windows of the lobby area can be opened or closed according to functional requirements.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Through the juxtaposition of patterns and materials, the interior space becomes a play of light and shadow.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

In the execution of the design, one of the challenges was the narrow nature of the site, which measured only 6 meters in width.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

By keeping the space simple and free of structural elements, functional flexibility is achieved.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

TM Studio an architectural office based in Shanghai, China headed by principal architect Tong Ming.

Reference: Zhulong

Triz Arte Showroom by Triz Arte


  ©See Chee Keong

Triz Arte Showroom functions as the reception of Singapore design firm Triz Arte. With fluid forms and sinuous lines, the showroom is an embodiment of the firm’s design philosophy, whch strives to harness the merits of both art and architecture. The design won an international award administered by Contract Magazine in 2010.

   ©See Chee Keong

The showroom asserts a definitive presence in a humble brick building which used to function as a warehouse storage facility. Sinuous surfaces and fluid lines break away from angular restraints of the original space to evoke exquisite geometries, documenting seamless gestures frozen in time.

©See Chee Keong

The space, like its fluid forms, is innovative and contingent, and can be altered according to events and needs. Invisible hinges and concealed alcoves transform the space from a showroom to a discussion room for meetings with clients.

©See Chee Keong

©See Chee Keong

With a few simple motions, functional elements are revealed. The movable components and customized objects fully utilize the leftover niches from the creation of organic forms. A space of movement and surprises, functionality is realized together with the radicalism of form.

©See Chee Keong

Atmospheric and surreal, the fluid contours of the space are suggestive yet ambivalent. In the mind of the observer, this could be a dreamscape, where meaning is multifarious and unbridled. Like a piece of abstract art, the formal ambiguity of the space becomes a canvas for one’s imagination.

Triz Arte is a Singapore-based design firm headed by Thriza Teo.