Vanke Experience Center by Urbanus


 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

The Vanke Experience Center by Urbanus is located in Shenzhen, China. It is the research facility of Vanke China, the largest real estate developer in the country.

 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

The experience center is located within an existing 1500 square meter rectangular exhibition hall that is four storeys high. With heavy, concrete supports and a regular floor plan, the old structure was sterile and uninspiring.

 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

In order to create a stimulating and imaginative environment, Urbanus inserted a light and transparent free form structure within the existing exhibition hall.

 Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

The interior of the building is also an experiment in the design of convertible spaces. Multifunctional in nature, they showcase the possibilities of space.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Urbanus is a architecture and urban design practice with offices in Shenzhen and Beijing. The firm’s works have been featured in publications such as Abitare, a+u, and Domus.

References: Zhulong, HomeWorld, BuildHR, Chinese-Architects

TM Studio Office by TM Studio


Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Based in Shanghai, China, TM Studio is headed by principal architect Tong Ming.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

In the renovation of their office space, a small residential unit located near Tongji University, all the non-supporting walls were torn down, expended, and merged to create one central space.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Following that, entire walls and ceilings were cladded with wood. Movable and foldable wooden doors were then installed, to achieve a functional flexibility that equips the studio to deal with different occasions.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Via: Chinese-Architects

Blur Hotel by Studio Pei-Zhu


Image: studiopeizhu.com

Blur Hotel by Studio Pei-Zhu is an additions and alterations project located in Beijing, China.

Image: studiopeizhu.com

The existing building, a government office described as a “backward looking pastische”, is located next to the Western Gate of the Forbidden City.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

In order to integrate the building into the historic fabric of the area, a continuous and semi-transparent façade was wrapped around the government office.

Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Made in the image of a Chinese lantern, the building lights up at night to reveal the activities taking place within.

Image: studiopeizhu.com

Other strategies employed in the refurbishment include the integration of the building with its surrounding architectural typology of the courtyard house. This is achieved through the creation of alternating vertical courtyards by carving into the concrete slab floors of the existing.

In addition, the ground floor is also opened up by assigning to it public-oriented programs.

Image: studiopeizhu.comImage: studiopeizhu.com
Image: http://www.chinese-architects.com

Image: studiopeizhu.com

Image: studiopeizhu.com

Image: studiopeizhu.com

Image: studiopeizhu.com

Studio Pei-Zhu is a Beijing-based architectural firm headed by Pei-Zhu. Its designs have been featured on Domus and Architectural Record.

References: Chinese-Architects, Studio Pei-Zhu

Shine by LEAD and Nelson Chow


 Shine, one of Hong Kong’s high-end fashion retailers, has employed Nelson Chow (NC Design & Architecture Ltd.) and LEAD (Laboratory for Explorative Architecture & Design Ltd.) to design their flagship store at Causeway Bay.

The most unique feature of the store is its undulating ceiling, created by over 900 shimmering white cords. Woven into undulating planes, they form Moiré patterns against the dark ceiling.

The ceiling creates an illusion of movement, forming warped and vibrating patterns which become more obvious when the shopper is moves around the store.

The back of the store is covered with black leather. A mirror strategically placed on the back wall extends the length of the ceiling.

       Photography by Dennis Lo.

Via: Dezeen

Home of Steven and Stephen by Stephen Siew


Image: C I & A Photography

Singaporean architect Stephen Siew has designed a home for himself and his partner that replicates the look of a luxury hotel in a cool white tranquility. The living and dining room have been combined into a flexible space with a myriad of mirrored surfaces that create unusual lighting effects.

Image: Stephen Siew

Dimension lines, arrows and a dotted elevation drawing of a Christmas tree adorn the otherwise white walls of the home.

Image: C I & A Photography

Image: C I & A Photography

Billowy ripplefold curtains wrap the bedroom chamber, creating a surreal cloud-like atmosphere when all the curtains are drawn. The openness of the layout can be appreciated in the master bathroom and bedroom, where a carefully layered but unrestricted space is crafted.

Image: C I & A Photography

The monochromatic palette is continued in the kitchen, where electrical outlets are cleverly concealed to maintain the homogeneity of the white surfaces.

Image: Stephen Siew

A wall of potted herbs in white vases form a green wall in the kitchen, offering sprigs of rosemary and thyme to the occupants as they cook.

Image: Stephen Siew
The entrance gate and door is a geometrical play on circles, also acting as a frame for festive ornaments that change with the season and time.

OCT Art and Design Gallery by Urbanus


Image: http://www.zhulong.com

The OCT Art and Design Gallery is an additions and alterations project by Urbanus located in Shenzhen, China. The original structure, built in the early 1980s, was a warehouse that served as the laundry house of the Shenzhen Bay Hotel.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

In the alteration, the warehouse was wholly preserved. A new glass façade with a hexagonal graphic pattern was built around the preserved warehouse.

 Image: http://www.china-designer.com

The hexagonal motif is repeated in the museum’s interior. Derived from various combinations and permutations of the hexagon, this results in a complex and irregularly shaped interior space.

 Image: http://www.china-designer.com

In the design, two distinct exhibition spaces were created through the use of materiality. In the first instance, the entire space is totally cladded in timber.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Another part of the museum employed concrete on all its surfaces.

 Image: http://www.china-designer.com

The irregular spaces of the new architectural intervention are in contrast to the rectangularity of the preserved warehouse, which is also accentuated by its white walls. The windows of the preserved warehouse are entirely boarded up, creating an enclosed exhibition space.

 Image: http://www.china-designer.com

Thus, it is only from the newly added architectural spaces that views of the surroundings can be taken in.

 Image: http://www.china-designer.com

The irregularity of the newly added spaces endows them with a functional flexibility. Besides serving as exhibition halls, they can also accommodate a variety of different events such as fashion, product and jewelry launches.

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

 Image: http://www.china-designer.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Image: http://www.zhulong.com

Urbanus is a architecture and urban design practice with offices in Shenzhen and Beijing. The firm’s works have been featured in publications such as Abitare, a+u, and Domus.

References: Baidu Library, Zhulong, China Designer 

Triz Arte Showroom by Triz Arte


  ©See Chee Keong

Triz Arte Showroom functions as the reception of Singapore design firm Triz Arte. With fluid forms and sinuous lines, the showroom is an embodiment of the firm’s design philosophy, whch strives to harness the merits of both art and architecture. The design won an international award administered by Contract Magazine in 2010.

   ©See Chee Keong

The showroom asserts a definitive presence in a humble brick building which used to function as a warehouse storage facility. Sinuous surfaces and fluid lines break away from angular restraints of the original space to evoke exquisite geometries, documenting seamless gestures frozen in time.

©See Chee Keong

The space, like its fluid forms, is innovative and contingent, and can be altered according to events and needs. Invisible hinges and concealed alcoves transform the space from a showroom to a discussion room for meetings with clients.

©See Chee Keong

©See Chee Keong

With a few simple motions, functional elements are revealed. The movable components and customized objects fully utilize the leftover niches from the creation of organic forms. A space of movement and surprises, functionality is realized together with the radicalism of form.

©See Chee Keong

Atmospheric and surreal, the fluid contours of the space are suggestive yet ambivalent. In the mind of the observer, this could be a dreamscape, where meaning is multifarious and unbridled. Like a piece of abstract art, the formal ambiguity of the space becomes a canvas for one’s imagination.

Triz Arte is a Singapore-based design firm headed by Thriza Teo.